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Making the 944 Lightweight(er)

Longtime no update... Over the summer I've been refining TheHoff. After a couple of outings to Brands Hatch I decided that I wanted to add lightness as per Colin Chapman. I wanted to retain the period features of the interior and most of the niceties but make it more of a lightweight than a racecar - which it is not. The goal was simply to remove about the average weight of a modest passenger that I'd take to a track day - as that is what was happening. I began by stripping out the interior and pulling the thick rubber & felt matting out. The glue they used back in the 80's to stick this stuff down was - let's say... very effective. The rear seat back went... I found that DW40 was the most suucessful glue residue remover after buying various specialist products that promised the world but just didn't work...after many long hours lots & lots of kilograms were being shed simply by removing rubber, felt and some sound deadening in the areas that I wanted exposed. After the back was stripped I started on the cockpit area: I was really keen to expose the tunnel - not only was it covered in carpet, but also rubber, felt and underneath sound deadening pads...german thoroughness. With the tunnel done, and feeling cheery I set about sorting the footwells... I may have to revisit those if they were going to be exposed but seeing as though they would get seats and the Porsche mat set putting back in; they're A-OK for now. So the tunnel started to get some finishing treatment - all prepped for some Arctic White paint: As this was the feature I was most excited about having exposed I was stoked with the way it was looking. Then it was on to the foot wells and the bits that would be exposed from under the mat set: Working backwards I prepped and painted the rear wheel arches and boot area: Then it was onto the inner sill areas alongside the seats & handbrake: With everything put back in I was very happy with the result - the exposed tunnel and sides set off the burgundy interior nicely. How much has TheHoff lost so far? 66kgs or 145lbs.

Comments

  1. I haven't checked this blog for ages and found this pretty interesting. I had to remove the rear seat base on my '84 944 to install seatbelts for my kids and completely agree about the glue they used... it's mental! You have to use all your strength to peel an inch at a time... I still don't think my arms and hands have recovered :)

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  2. I haven't checked this blog for ages and found this pretty interesting. I had to remove the rear seat base on my '84 944 to install seatbelts for my kids and completely agree about the glue they used... it's mental! You have to use all your strength to peel an inch at a time... I still don't think my arms and hands have recovered :)

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  4. Keep up the good work mate!

    So if you take the passenger side seat out for a track day, your would potentially looking at 90 kg lighter ?

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    1. I'm not sure what the passenger seat weights are bu they're hefty even if they're the lighter non-electric versions

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  5. This may be a little off topic, but I would appreciate any help I can get! I bought my boyfriend a 968 for Christmas and am trying to get subs installed. The speaker place said something about needing a "slim box" first and I don't know where to start...can anybody give me a place to start?? I live in Anderson, SC. Thanks!!!!

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    Replies
    1. Sorry Mo - I'm no expert on ICE installs

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  6. Exposed tunnel looks great - hows the console fitment sans carpet? -cybe

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  7. Exposed tunnel looks great - hows the console fitment sans carpet? -cybe

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Cybe - no fitment issues at all

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